Historic Preservation

Issues» Historic Preservation


McNaughton Cottage

Tahawus- MacNaughton Cottage

The Tahawus lands were leased to sportsmens' clubs from 1876 to 1947. In 1901, Vice President Teddy Roosevelt stayed at MacNaughton Cottage while he hiked Mount Marcy.


Ft. Ticonderoga Carillion Point

Carillon Point - Fort Ticonderoga

The Iroquois Indians called the land between Lake George and Lake Champlain Cheonderoga, meaning "place between two waters." 


North Creek

North Creek Station

In 1901, when McKinley was shot, Teddy Roosevelt rushed out of the Tahawus Club in the Adirondacks and raced by carriage over rough roads to the North Creek train station.


Kinderhook

Kinderhook Creek - Lindenwald

The Martin Van Buren National Historic Site preserves and maintains Lindenwald, the retirement home and estate of Martin Van Buren, the eighth president of the United States.


Saratoga Battlefield_TedSpiegel

Saratoga Battlefield

The Saratoga National Historical Park stands as a proud reminder of the series of pivotal battles that turned the tide of the Revolutionary War in the fall of 1777.


Top Cottage

Top Cottage

President Franklin D. Roosevelt designed Top Cottage his Hyde Park, New York retreat himself, making it one of the few presidential residences designed by a president while in office.


Verplank House

Verplanck Landing

Verplanck Landing is a significant archeological and historic site on the eastern banks of the Hudson River in Dutchess County.


Glenclyffe

Glenclyffe - Garrison Institute

Benedict Arnold rode through it trying to escape to the British. New York Governor Hamilton Fish, later to become Secretary of State under President Ulysses Grant, lived on it.


Washington's Headquarters

Washington's Headquarters

In preparation for the final days of the Revolutionary War in 1782 and 1783, General George Wahington set up headquarters at the Hasbrouck family farmhouse. 


Washington's Lookout

Washington's Lookout

A rocky promontory on the flanks of Buckberg Mountain this site was reputedly used by General George Washington and Colonel “Mad” Anthony to plan a surprise attack.  


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